Pani Jurek

Pani Jurek was created by Magda Jurek. Magda is an artist and designer who studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw. As such, there is evidence of theoretical methods in her work combined with the intent of developing unique, irregular creations.

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Pani Jurek’s lamps can be adjusted and reorganized in an interior, allowing the consumer to have the opportunity to make it their own. Magda pays tribute to her Polish upbringing in the nineteen eighties, as forming part of her inspiration, which involved mass-produced apartment blocks. In such conditions, products were condensed and served a variety of purposes.

Magda, and therefore Pani Jurek, also places large emphasis on sustaining the environment. Due to the fact that Pani Jurek’s lamps can be used in a variety of ways, consumers respond by purchasing less items. The brand is also co-founder of the association “Based in Warshaw”, whose purpose is to create social design and design for communal areas.

Arguably the four most popular Pani Jurek lamps are the Plika Lights, Maria S.C. Chandelier, Loop Line, and Hook Line. The Pikla Light is produced from a variety of coloured fibres attached to white ceramic elements. According to ancient Polish customs, an untidy knot near the ceiling captured evil spirits. Furthermore, as is the idea behind Pani Jurek’s lamps, consumers can engage with the Pikla Light by braiding, knotting, or tangling it to attain different styles.

The Maria S.C. Chandelier is manufactured with test tubes from the laboratory places in a couple of plywood bands. This results in a look that is both traditional and unique. The inspiration behind this lamp is Maria Sklodowska-Curie, a Polish Scientist who presented the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Consumers can once again make use of their own creativity by detaching selective tubes.

Finally, the Loop Line and Hook Line are similar in their approach. The Loop Line is made of reams of rope, which allows the light to be transported across the entire interior. The Hook Line, on the other hand, also comes with a long piece of rope but includes an industrial hook so as to allow for a minimum of two locations. Due to the length of the rope, the consumer is able to experiment with a variety of decorative knots and loops.